Middle East

A Deal Will Not Stop the Mullahs from Going Nuclear

Written by Majid Rafizadeh

The Biden administration has spent all its political capital to resurrect the nuclear deal — presumably to perpetuate the idea that a nuclear agreement with the Iranian regime will stop Tehran from obtaining nuclear weapons. Unfortunately, believing that the ruling mullahs of Iran will halt their nuclear advancement with a deal is laughable.

The Iranian regime has even boasted about its shrewd policy of deceiving and misleading the international community during the previous nuclear deal. One of terms of the 2015 nuclear deal, for instance, was that the core of the Arak nuclear reactor would be filled with concrete and disabled. Iran, according to the country’s Fars news agency, claimed that it had poured in the concrete and destroyed the reactor core. The US State Department, during the Obama-Biden administration, confirmed the move as well.

Later, however, Ali Akbar Salehi, the former head of the Atomic Energy Organization of Iran, openly admitted in an interview on Iran state television that the government had not complied with this requirement; instead, it had misled the international community: “For three years we have been saying we did not pour cement into the Arak heavy water reactor.” When the regime’s television host asked him about the video showing concrete being poured into the Arak reactor’s pipes, Salehi responded:

“[N]ot the pipes you see here. We had purchased similar pipes, but I couldn’t announce it at that time. Only one person knows so in Iran, the highest senior official. No one else knew. We needed to be smart. In addition, to not destroy the bridges behind us, we needed to also be building bridges, so that if we needed to return, we could return faster.””[N]ot the pipes you see here. We had purchased similar pipes, but I couldn’t announce it at that time. Only one person knows so in Iran, the highest senior official. No one else knew. We needed to be smart. In addition, to not destroy the bridges behind us, we needed to also be building bridges, so that if we needed to return, we could return faster.”

Read more at Gatestone Institute

About the author

Majid Rafizadeh